Travel Photos – The Barefoot Nomad https://www.thebarefootnomad.com Travel. Tech. Family. Fun. Fri, 15 Jun 2018 22:40:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Tips For Getting Great Family Video and Photos with the GoPro HERO 6 Black and Sport Chek https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/tech-2/tips-for-getting-great-family-video-and-photos-with-the-gopro-hero-6-black-and-sport-chek/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/tech-2/tips-for-getting-great-family-video-and-photos-with-the-gopro-hero-6-black-and-sport-chek/#comments Mon, 20 Nov 2017 22:10:00 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=15287 So, you’re a regular person and not an extreme athlete or a pro surfer, and thinking of getting a GoPro video camera? Spoiler alert, you probably should.

I’m sure everyone has seen those amazing GoPro videos of surfers on a perfect wave, snowboarders carving down a mountain side, bikers taking 50 foot jumps or those extreme athletes jumping out of perfectly good airplanes or the side of a cliff. I love those.

Honestly though, if anyone needs a compact, hands free camera, it’s a parent. I find myself wishing daily for another set of arms, so carrying around a big, bulky camera just doesn’t work.

Family pool fun taken with GoPro HERO6 Black

Poolside in Mexico. Photo taken with GoPro HERO6 Black

So, it’s probably no surprise that we get a lot of questions from fellow parents about the GoPro who want to know is it waterproof? Is it easy to use? How much does it cost? Does it take photos, too? Those are a lot of questions for one tiny camera.

So when Sport Chek reached out to us to review the new GoPro HERO 6 Black, we jumped at the chance. It’s a perfect opportunity to answer all of those questions and more.

First impressions

Before we got our new HERO 6, we owned the GoPro HERO4 SILVER. It’s a great little camera and we’ve gotten some great footage the past few years, but I always disliked how we had to keep it in an external casing.

That’s changed with the newer GoPros, namely the HERO 5 and Hero 6. Unlike older GoPros (like the GoPro Hero 4 and earlier) the HERO 6 doesn’t need an external case to make it waterproof. This is my favorite feature, as it makes the GoPro HERO 6 so easy and convenient to use, and I never have to worry about putting it in a waterproof case.

GoPro Photo of the GoPro-8406

GoPro HERO 6 Video and photo quality

The GoPro takes great photos and videos. Even better, this tiny camera takes stunning 4K video, which means your family memories will be preserved in stunning detail.

Photo of Jasper, Alberta taken with GoPro HERO6 Black

Jasper, Alberta. Taken with GoPro HERO6 Black

To give it a real try, we took the GoPro HERO 6 Black with us on a early family winter vacation to Mexico and it was the perfect chance to test the GoPro Hero6 in a real world situation.

Take a look at the video below, filmed in 4K on our little GoPro HERO 6 Black. The video is raw and unedited, taken straight out of the camera. We didn’t always have the new image stabiliser on (our bad) and we’ve added titles and music, plus cut out some footage, but we haven’t done anything else. The video quality is just a sample of what you’ll get from this camera.

GoPro HERO6 Features

There’s a lot to like about this camera, and I’m especially fond of the burst feature for photos.

Like a lot of you, I always seem to just miss that perfect moment, like when my kids actually smile at the camera. With the burst mode, I just click the button, and the GoPro takes a burst of photos over several seconds. No more missed photos or that perfect smile.

The GoPro HERO 6 is waterproof to 33 meters. We’ve snorkeled with it, played with it in the pool, and even carried it with us as we boogie boarded in the waves. I let the kids carry it around half of the time, and they dunked it in the pool and the ocean dozens of times. Despite all of this, it remained perfectly waterproof.

Tip! We use a GoPro floating handle to hold the GoPro. This keeps it from getting lost in the surf, or sinking to the bottom of a pool.

underwater with the GoPro HERO 6

Underwater pool photo. Taken with GoPro HERO 6.

How to use the GoPro Hero 6

Is the GoPro easy to use? Well, it’s not hard to use, but using a GoPro is a little different than a smartphone or other camera. If you take ten minutes to learn how to use the GoPro at the beginning, you’ll pretty much know everything you need to.

Thankfully, there are only a couple of buttons: a shutter button, and a mode/power button. There’s also a touch screen in back, which makes getting through the menus pretty easy. Unlike the older models, you can see the photos and video as you’re taking them on the LCD screen just like a regular camera.

You can also download the GoPro app and connect the GoPro to your smartphone to take remote shots or to easily control all the settings. It can also save the videos and pictures directly to your phone so you can easily share them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

GoPro HERO6 Black touch screen

GoPro HERO 6 Voice Recognition

The GoPro HERO6 even comes with voice recognition, which we found works really well. Talk about hands free!

You can use voice recognition to turn the GoPro on and off, take photos and videos, and a lot more. It really makes mounting the camera to your helmet or chest strap easier than ever. Just tell it when to start and stop recording no matter what your hands are up to.

GoPro HERO 6 Video Quality

What’s the quality like? Video quality with the GoPro HERO 6 black is an impressive 4K video shooting at 60p, or 60 full frames per second. Those high frame rates per second also mean that it’s excellent at capturing slow motion video. As well as 4K, you can record in 1080p240, 1080p120, or the more classic 1080p60. What that means is that you can still record in high definition and still enjoy top rate quality with varying compression. This means that if space or extended recording is important, you can lower the resolution and not lose a great deal.

Jasper, Alberta taken with the GoPro HERO 6 Black Action cam

Taken with GoPro HERO 6. Jasper, Alberta.

Here are a few nerdy facts about video compression for you. The GoPro HERO 6 Black uses a new video codec called High-Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) H.265. It means that the video size can be smaller than the older H.264 protocol, but still retain higher 4K quality. Unfortunately, because H.265 is so new, many video editing software and devices can’t decode its advanced compression at the moment. Luckily, most of the newer Androids and iPhones can play H.265 natively, so wider support is guaranteed as more people get on board with using it. YouTube already supports the new H.265 codec.

Drumheller, Alberta hoodoos taken with the GoPro HERO 6 Black Action cam

Taken with GoPro HERO 6. Drumheller, Alberta.

GoPro HERO 6 Image Stabilization

The GoPro HERO 6 has digital image stabilization making for steadier video. Because it’s so tiny, we did find that we got some shake when the HERO6 was handheld, but there was less when it was mounted on something like a helmet, or the buoyant floaty handle grip we use. We also didn’t realize that we had turned image stabilization off for part of our trip until we had later watched the videos. For smoother motion, especially when it’s handheld, you’ll want to leave image stabilization on.

Jasper, Alberta. Taken with GoPro HERO 6

So is the GoPro for you?

Well, if you’re looking for a camera with 4K video, then yes, the GoPro HERO6 definitely does 4K video well and with it’s wide field of view or the new Superview, you won’t be missing anything as long as you have lots of good natural light.

Want a rugged, waterproof camera that you can take almost anywhere? Well, the GoPro HERO6 definitely fits that bill as well. With it’s small frame and rugged waterproof abilities, as well as the built in image stabilization, the GoPro can take what you’re giving and keep on recording.

Love playing with new technology? With it’s small touchscreen interface, voice recognition and it’s ability to connect seamlessly with your existing smartphone, the GoPro definitely ticks all the boxes when it comes to new tech. There’s a small learning curve, but it’s nothing that a few minutes watching how-to videos or a little reading can’t cure.

The GoPro HERO6 Black HD Action Camera transforms your adventures into incredible QuikStories directly on your phone.

Shopping for a GoPro in Canada? Sport Chek is an official supplier and carries all the latest GoPro devices and accessories.

The Platinum Floating GoPro Camera Mount is designed to ensure your GoPro camera floats if you happen to drop it. We use ours every time we take our GoPro in the water.

Looking for a deal?

Get 10% off your first purchase and free shipping on orders over $49 if you join the SportChek.ca email list here.

Get free shipping on orders $99+ at Sport Chek here!

Thanks to Sport Chek for providing us with the GoPro HERO 6 Black for this review. It was on the wishlist and we definitely enjoyed using it.

Shop Sports Equipment, Apparel, Footwear and more at Sport Chek! Click Here!
GoPro HERO 6 Tips and Photos | GoPro HERO 6 tips | GoPro HERO 6 photos | GoPro HERO 5 Black #gopro #goprophotography

GoPro Hero 6 Photo Tips for family photos | GoPro HERO 6 tips | GoPro HERO 6 photos | GoPro HERO 5 Black #gopro #goprophotography The GoPro HERO 6 Black tips | GoPro HERO 6 tips | GoPro HERO 6 photos | GoPro HERO 5 Black #gopro #goprophotography ]]>
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5 Bizarre and Unique Deserts You Need to Visit https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/5-bizarre-and-unique-deserts-you-need-to-visit/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/5-bizarre-and-unique-deserts-you-need-to-visit/#comments Thu, 04 Feb 2016 18:00:43 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=11057 Bizarre and Unique Deserts You Need to Visit

Not all deserts around the globe are full of sand and dunes. There are at least five deserts here on Earth that are as bizarre and unique as anything you’ll see on another planet.

Like all deserts, water is tough to find and the sun shines nearly constantly. However, in these places, you’re more likely to lose your breath due to their bizarre beauty than because of thirst. The cool part is that you can fly to a city nearby almost every one of these places.

Salt pyramids by Francisco Orts

Salt pyramids at Salar de Uyuni. Photo by Francisco Orts

Let’s take a look at five bizarre and unique deserts you need to visit at one point in your travels.

Sand dunes that create music

The large and sparsely populated country of Mongolia, has an extraordinary culture. The fact that steppes and deserts cover the vast majority of the country has a tremendous impact on every day life for Mongolians and travelers alike.

One of the most famous deserts in Mongolia is the Khongoryn Els. Locally, it’s better known as the Singing Dunes Desert.

Khongoryn Els Singing Sand Dunes. Photo by

Khongoryn Els Singing Sand Dunes. Photo by travelmag.com

It got its nickname due to a unique natural phenomenon that happens in only a few dozen places around the world. When strong winds carry the sand, and the sand dunes collapse, it creates a loud roaring sound. The locals refer to this sound as the song of the desert, giving the area itself the name of the Singing Dunes Desert.

Walking on clouds of salt

Near the Andes in Bolivia, on the edges of the Atacama Desert, there’s a vast and empty salt lake called Salar de Uyuni that is almost 11,000 square kilometers wide.

It’s the largest salt flat in the world, and Salar de Uyuni has also been called the world’s largest mirror, as salt on the surface reflects the sky during the summer rainy season. Coupled with the fact that the whole area deviates in altitude by only few millimeters, this reflection creates the illusion that you’re not walking so much on dry land, but on real white clouds. It’s definitely a unique feeling.

Walking on Clouds by Francisco Orts

Walking on clouds of salt at Salar de Uyuni. Photo by Francisco Orts

The snow white, salt-colored ground is also covered with thousands of hexagon shaped pyramids. These man-made salt mounds are there for drying the salt before it gets mined away. Seeing thousands of them in every direction isn’t something you get to see every day.

A snow desert in the middle of Africa

A few hours away from Egypt’s capital of Cairo, you can stop by one of the most amazing wastelands on the continent, the White Desert. A beautiful variety of sculptures form here when desert sand storms eat away at the lime formations found throughout the region.

White Desert mushroom formation. Photo by

White Desert mushroom formation. Photo by Julieanh

The best known sand sculpture in the area is considered to be 4.5 meters tall Fungus Rock, resembling a giant boletus mushroom. Fungus Rock is a naturally formed white rock that looks as pure as snow.

A desert with hundreds of fingers

Australians often refer to the Pinnacle Desert as the Fingers Desert, because the whole area is dotted with limestone towers that look similar to human limbs.

Pinnacles Desert. Photo by Jakub Michankow

Pinnacles Desert. Photo by Jakub Michankow

Located 146 km north of Perth, Australia, some of the limestone limbs are barely visible from the ground, while others reach up to five meters in height.

Walking around these fingers can feel downright alien, however spotting a local grey kangaroo or a red eyed emu wandering around them quickly reminds you that you’re still in Australia.

Definitely something to write home about!

A desert canvas

Millions of year ago, erosion worked hard to create this last bizarre but truly beautiful desert, the easily accessible Painted Desert. The Painted Desert can be found in southern Arizona, in the USA.

Painted Desert. Photo by

Painted Desert. Photo by PetrifiedForestNPS

Often called the Colorful Desert, this vast natural canvas looks like it was painted with layers of orange, brown and yellow pencils.

It’s also worth mentioning that this desert is pretty close to another amazing work of nature; the Grand Canyon, so you can stop by both of these beautiful places and enjoy something truly unique and gorgeous all in the same day.

Not a desert, but cool nonetheless

Not really considered a desert but definitely fitting for its uniqueness, Devils Marbles Conservation Reserve near Alice Springs, Australia gets high points when it comes to natural wonders.

These behemoth granite boulders litter the landscape in every direction and look like they were dropped from the hands of a giant. It doesn’t take much to realize that mother nature is definitely the greatest artist of all time!

Devils Marbles Australia

Micki at Devils Marbles at sunset

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Enter Now to Win Travel Photo Roulette 110 #PhotoRoulette Theme: Doors https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/contests/enter-now-to-win-travel-photo-roulette-110-photoroulette-theme-doors/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/contests/enter-now-to-win-travel-photo-roulette-110-photoroulette-theme-doors/#comments Thu, 20 Aug 2015 17:00:00 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=10343 Doorway photo in this week's #PhotoRoulette!  ]]> We’re so excited to host this week’s #PhotoRoulette photo competition!

AND THE WINNER IS…

Josie from Housesitting Travel

I loved the greenery and bright colors surrounding this charming door. I’d love to spend the evening in a little B&B like this!

It was a tough decision to make – we had a lot of great entries!

Europe-2010-068 800 px Jose House Sitting Travel

And our runner-up

We loved this bright, vibrant, shot from Erin and Josh with Travel with Bender.

It was a very close second, but we felt the photo focused a little more on their beautiful daughter than on the door.

DSC01764

Last week, Tom of Travel Past 50 hosted the 109th round of the competition with the theme “Home”. Below is our winning photograph of my childhood home on the Canadian prairies.

Storm Clouds Over Central Alberta

The Contest

Every few weeks, a contest open to bloggers from all over the world, participate in what is called Travel Photo Roulette. It’s an ongoing contest that allows travel bloggers to feature their best photos in a wide range of categories. We’ve entered the contest a number of times, and have finally won! Winning the contest means you get to host the next round. That’s why you’re seeing this post on The Barefoot Nomad. Even if you aren’t planning to enter, feel free to stop back here in the next few weeks to see all the great entries.

Round #110: Doorways

Now for this week’s competition: Doorways around the world.

Wherever we go, we’re fascinated by doorways. You never know who’s on the other side, or what secrets are just past the entrance. Some doors are incredibly ornate, some have been weathered with age however what they all have in common is that they are gateways into another person’s private world and an areas culture.

Be sure to enter your doorway photo in this weeks #TravelRoulette! It doesn’t matter whether you’re a newbie to photography or a vet, everyone stands the same chance.

Good luck! Let’s see those photos!

Here are a few of our doorway photos for inspiration.

Merida White Weathered Door Mexico

Merida Faded Doorway Calle 51

Weathered door in Central Porto Oporto Portugal

Weathered door in Central Porto

About Travel Photo Roulette:

Travel Photo Roulette is a competition started by Jeremy at Living the Dream way back in November 2010 as away for travel bloggers to connect and share their photos.

The Contest

The contest is pretty straightforward. The winner of the previous round chooses a new theme and hosts the competition on their blog, inviting others to share their photos over the course of a week or two. As the end of the contest period, the host selects a winner and the process repeats itself.

The Rules

1. One submission per blog please, so sites that have 2+ authors only get one entry.
2. You will need a personal blog or website to participate (so you can host if you win!)
3. Post processing, cropping, correcting for red eyes and other flaws is fine.
4. Abstract submissions are welcome. But if you want to win, it’s probably best that the judge understands your interpretation
5. Hosts should keep themes general so all bloggers can participate. Avoid specifics like ‘Eiffel Tower’; instead choose a more open theme, like ‘monuments’ or ‘monuments at night’
6. Abstract themes can be fun, as long as everyone can understand. ‘Overlooking creation’ is good, ‘Kafkaesque’ is not
7. No obscene photos or themes allowed. Suggestive themes and photography might be accepted, but be careful. Remember, the host is all-powerful
8. Themes may be reused after a period of time; however new photos must be submitted. Keep it fresh!
9. You do not have to take the photo within the week of the contest period to submit it.
10. Most important: ALL PHOTOS MUST BE YOUR OWN.
11. Please spread the word about Travel Photo Roulette via Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and any other means you can think of and use the hashtag #PhotoRoulette
12. It’s a game, so have fun with it.

How to Enter

To enter, simply leave a comment below with a link to your photo and it will be added to the post. (You can also send us an email using the “Contact” link above.) A brief description of the picture is always welcome to provide some background and context. Also, please don’t forget to include your name, a link to your blog, and any pertinent social media information so everyone can come see what you’re all about (and so we can contact the winner!).
The contest will run until Friday, August 31, 2015 at midnight EST, after which time we will select the winner. We’ll share the results right in this post.

Spread the Word

Tweet about this contest using the hashtag #PhotoRoulette and feel free to share this page with your friends on social media – the more the merrier! We love seeing your comments so please don’t be bashful about sharing your opinions.

Previous Winners

Finally, here are the past winners of the contest – as you can see, it’s been running for a while! Click on the link to take you to some great travel blogs and wonderful themed photos.

  1. Nov 2010 Living the Dream: Animals
  2. Nov 2010 Skinny Backpacker: Road Signs
  3. Nov 2010 Dream a Little Dream: Street Art
  4. Dec 2010 Flashpacker HQ: Festival
  5. Dec 2010 Over Yonderlust: Landmarks
  6. Dec 2010 Don’t Ever Look Back: Beaches
  7. Jan 2011 ThePlanetD: Portraits
  8. Jan 2011 Travel with a Mate: Motion
  9. Jan 2011 Johnny Vagabond: Water
  10. Feb 2011 Ken Kaminesky: Urban
  11. Feb 2011 Travels of Adam: Friday Night
  12. Mar 2011 Itchy Feet Chronicles: The Journey
  13. Mar 2011 Brendan’s Adventures: Changing Seasons
  14. April 2011 Shutterfeet: Storytelling
  15. April 2011 10 Times One: Piousness
  16. April 2011 Beached Eskimo: Learning
  17. May 2011 Travel Junkies: Architecture
  18. June 2011 Destination World [-404-]: Transportation
  19. June 2011 Living the Dream: Paradise
  20. June 2011 Vagabond Quest: Clothes
  21. July 2011 The Unframed World: Symmetry
  22. July 2011 Beached Eskimo: Home
  23. July 2011 BackPackerBanter: Inspiration
  24. Aug 2011 WanderingTrader: Darkness
  25. Aug 2011 Finding the Universe: Tranquillity
  26. Sep 2011 Fearful Adventurer: Food
  27. Sep 2011 Adventures of a GoodMan: City
  28. Oct 2011 Globe-Trekking.com: Reflection
  29. Oct 2011 Scene With A Hart: Framing
  30. Nov 2011 Vagabond Quest: Silhouettes
  31. Nov 2011 Hecktic Travels: Music
  32. Dec 2011 Globetrotter Girls: Love
  33. Dec 2011 Man on the lam: Humor
  34. Jan 2012 My Walkabout: Winter
  35. Jan 2012 The Art of Slow Travel: Blue
  36. Feb 2012 Ten times One: Depth of the Field
  37. Feb 2012 Runaway Juno: … Digital Nomad Moment
  38. Mar 2012 Nomadbiba: Sunshine
  39. Mar 2012 Travel With Kat: Local Character
  40. April 2012 The Travel Bunny: Street Scene
  41. April 2012 Adventure Crow [-404-]: Spirit of the Country
  42. May 2012 Food Travel Bliss [-404-]: Evening
  43. May 2012 Matt Gibson: Adventure
  44. May 2012 Flashpacker HQ: Once In A Lifetime
  45. July 2012 Dusty Main: Surreal
  46. Aug 2012 2away: Smile

    1. Aug 2012 Bridges & Balloons: Splendour…
    2. Sep 2012 The GypsyNester: What the ?!
    3. Oct 2012 Runaway Juno: Sweet
    4. Nov 2012 GQ Trippin: Play
    5. Nov 2012 Life’s Little Victories: Friendship
    6. Dec 2012 Breakaway Backpacker: Face
    7. Jan 2013 Fly, Icarus, Fly: Serendipity
    8. Feb 2013 Travel Transmissions: Lost in Thought
    9. Feb 2013 Wanderlusters: The Natural World
    10. Mar 2013 Travel Junkies: Patterns
    11. April 2013 Living the Dream: Your First Time
    12. May 2013 Getting Stamped: The Sun Goes Down
    13. June 2013 The GypsyNester: Cheesy Tourist Diversions
    14. June 2013 Boomeresque: Revolution
    15. July 2013 Breakaway Backpacker: Colorful
    16. Aug 2013 Around This World: Mountains
    17. Aug 2013 Passports & Pamplemousse Hands at Work
    18. Sep 2013 TurtlesTravel Dance
    19. Sep 2013 Keep calm and travel The Sea
    20. Sep 2013 Travel Photo Discovery: The Market
    21. Oct 2013 Am I Nearly There Yet?: Travel Fails
    22. Oct 2013 The GypsyNester: Weird Regional Foods
    23. Nov 2013 Sophie’s World: Trees
    24. Nov 2013 SHOuTography: Party
    25. Dec 2013 Adventures of a Goodman: Ruin
    26. Dec 2013 Have Blog Will Travel: Light
    27. Jan 2014 This World Rocks: Crowds
    28. Jan 2014 Travel Past 50: Competition
    29. Feb 2014 The Working Traveller: Working
    30. Mar 2014 Travels with Carole: Umbrellas
    31. April 2014 Independent Travel Help Quirky
    32. April 2014 Quit Job Travel World Statues
    33. May 2014 Nomad is Beautiful People Sleeping
    34. May 2014 Backpack Me: Mouthwatering
    35. June 2014 20 Years Hence: The Face of A Nation
    36. July 2014 Two for the Road: Into the Wild
    37. July 2014 TurtlesTravel: Summer!
    38. Aug 2014 Adventures Around Asia: Candid
    39. Aug 2014 Travel with Kevin and Ruth: Hiking
    40. Sept 2014 Till The Money Runs Out: Transport
    41. Sept 2014 The Crowded Planet: Wild World
    42. Sept 2014 ZigZag On Earth: The 4 Elements
    43. Oct 2014 Travel Addicts: Heritage
    44. Oct 2014 Living the Dream: Your Grand Adventure
    45. Oct 2014 Getting Stamped: Inspire
    46. Nov 2014 Flashpacker HQ: Viewpoint
This list was re-formatted by dare2go.com. If you like to use this two-column layout in your post please download the code here and follow instructions on same page.

The winners and themes in 2015. Click the link to go directly to that entry to see some fab photographs.

    1. Jan 2015 Adventures of a GoodMan: WOW!
    2. Jan 2015 ZigZag On Earth: Roads and Tracks
    3. Feb 2015 Where’s The Gos?: Street Art
    4. Mar 2015 Ice Cream and Perma Frost: Frozen
    5. Mar 2015 Journey Jottings: Detail
    6. April 2015 House Sitting Travel: What’s your Angle?
    7. April 2015 JetWayz: Spiritual Beauty
    8. April 2015 The Trading Travelers: Celebrate
    9. May 2015 Street Food World Tour: Epic
    10. May 2015 Next Stop Who Knows: Landscape
    11. May 2015 We Travel Together: Wildlife
    12. May 2015 Vagabond Way: Festival
    13. June 2015 Travel Addicts: Landmarks
    14. June 2015 TravelnLass: Wrinkles
    15. July 2015 Anita’s Feast: Food Markets
    16. July 2015 Dare2Go: Dry
    17. August 2015 Travel Past 50: Home

Enter the contest by adding a comment below or by emailing us using our contact form. Again, be sure to include a link to the image, a link to your blog, and any other information that will allow us to contact you.

Entry 1:

Josie from Housesitting Travel

My cute little door is from Conrad’s and my B&B in Bergen, Norway. We arrived via the night train from Oslo and were so charmed to find our pre-booked lodging just on the outskirts of downtown. We didn’t spend much time here though because it was July and the sun went down at 1 a.m. and came up again at 3:30 a.m.!

Europe-2010-068 800 px Jose House Sitting TravelEntry 2:

Anne from Let Me Be Free

While I was in Cambodia I captured this image of a monk at one of the temples. It makes me feel very relaxed looking at this picture.

dsc00369 Anne Let Me Be Free

Entry 3

Carole Terwilliger Meyers from Berkley and Beyond

Though this door is painted such a dark blue that it almost looks black, it is the entrance to the exceptional Blue Door Inn in Mendocino, California. Situated within an immaculately updated 1883 Victorian house, it is tastefully furnished in contemporary English style and housebaked cookies are always available.

mendocino Carole Terwilliger Meyers

Entry 4

Brent Huntley from Brent’s Favorite Photos.

I loved the double level set of doors at Chang Deok Gung in Seoul, South Korea.

Chang Deok Gung Palace Brent Huntley

Entry 5

Noel Morata from Travel Photo Discovery

I’m submitting this green door – it is from a small hamlet in Northern Italy.

Noel Morata Borghetto-Italy-5

Entry 6

Juergen | dare2go.com

I love this hand carved door which we noticed in Villa de Leyva in Colombia. It depicts perfectly the rural life in this region. The bottom right panes shows fossils which the area is famous for. #door #handcarved #VillaDeLeyva #Colombia

Juergen dare2go cd12b960f8f63aa6127d10ed48644827

Entry 7

Blanca Pauliukevicius

I am also fascinated by doors, especially old ones. This is one of the oldest in the US. I shot this during my honeymoon in St. Augustine, Florida in December 2008.

blogger-image--2016923230 Blanca Pauliukevicius

Entry 8

Rebecca Hall (Bex) of Life Beyond Borders.

This one is a ‘doorway’ of a different sort. The canvas glamping tent amongst the woods in Moran State Park, Orcas Island, San Juan Islands chain in the Pacific Northwest, just off the coast of Seattle.

Rebecca Hall Bex IMG_3613

Entry 9

Suzanne Fluhr of Boomeresque

My photo is of the door to Nelson Mandela’s cell in the infamous Robben Island prison off the coast of Cape Town, South Africa, where he spent 17 years of his 27 years of imprisonment by the apartheid government. Nelson Mandela’s life is a testament to the fact that prison cell doors can keep people in, but not ideas.

Mandelas-cell-straightened-e1440483255427

 

Entry 10

Erin and Josh with Travel with Bender

Antigua Guatemala. History. Antique. Old. And the perfect backdrop for laughing children.

DSC01764

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Travel Photo: Ayers Rock (Uluru), Northern Territory, Australia https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/travel-photo-ayers-rock-uluru-northern-territory-australia/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/travel-photo-ayers-rock-uluru-northern-territory-australia/#comments Tue, 10 Mar 2015 22:00:58 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=1569 Ayers Rock / Uluru, Australia at Sunset

Ayers Rock / Uluru in Australia at Sunset

Ayers Rock, or Uluru to the local Anangu Aboriginal people, is a large sandstone rock formation in the southern part of the Northern Territory in central Australia. It’s about 3 and a half hours south west of the nearest large town, Alice Springs.

The area around the rock outcropping includes a few water springs, waterholes and rock caves with some ancient paintings. There are numerous guided tours and seeing the rock is a great way to learn about its Aboriginal history.

Truth be told, it may seem like a long way to travel just to see a giant rock, but the entire experience can be quite memorable.

Whether you’re enjoying the sunrise or sunset views (the only time the rock truly looks red) with the traditional glass of champagne or hiking around the 9.4 km trail at it’s base, Uluru needs to be seen from different angles throughout the day to be fully appreciated.

The color and texture change so much depending on the time of day you would almost believe it was alive. The nearby domed rocks of Kata Tjuta (the Olgas) is equally captivating, has a few walks of it’s own and will leave you with a feeling of wonder.

The drive there can get a little boring, however, the occasional kangaroo and emu sightings, the red dirt and scrub bush, the camel ranches and the beautiful Australian outback sky are all interesting things to see along the way. They have a nice resort/campground in nearby Yulara (Ayers Rock Resort) where you can stay for a few days. If you go you’ll definitely want to see at least one sunrise or sunset viewing and I would recommend against any extended driving in the dark when you’re new to the outback.

Here’s a travel tip: If you’re driving in the outback by wary of kangaroos. For whatever reason when they’re on the move they rarely stray from their path.

When we drove up the Oodnadatta Track and the Stuart Highway in our van from Adelaide to Darwin and then across from Darwin to Cairns we saw countless kangaroos and even more carcasses along the highway. More than once we had to stop the car to let a kangaroo jump across.

The funny part is that in a lot of places you can see the kangaroo coming from a mile away. They’re usually bouncing perpendicular to the road and traveling at a decent speed. Even though you’re 10 times they’re size and are quite visible they don’t seem to notice that you’re there. They’ll run right into the side of your vehicle if you’re at the wrong spot at the wrong time, even if you’re at a complete standstill!

Next to the zigzagging road trains, the kangaroos are the biggest threat on the roads in the outback and aren’t so easily dismissed.

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Travel Photo: St Martin’s Rural Charm https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/travel-photo-st-martins-rural-charm/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/travel-photo-st-martins-rural-charm/#comments Tue, 17 Feb 2015 18:51:38 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=2073 Goats on St Martin

Goats on St Martin

In the northeast Caribbean, the island of St Martin is a mixture of sophisticated restaurants, stunning beaches and rural charm. The island is divided between two nations, with the more populous Southern part owned by the Netherlands (Sint Maarten) and the larger, less populous North owned by France (Saint Martin).

The Dutch side of the island is well known for buzzing nightlife, guavaberry drinks, casinos and gorgeous beaches. The quieter French side is home to exquisite, but moderately priced, restaurants, nude beaches and duty free shopping.

The dual nationality of the island makes for some great cultural diversity, especially when coupled with the island’s Caribbean roots, and the fact that a local dialect of English is the most common language. Because of the diversity of the island, you’ll see the name spelled many different ways, including St Martaan, St Maartan, St Martin, St Marten and St Maarten.

However you choose to spell it, the best way to get a feel for St Martin is to rent a car and spend a day touring the island. It’s an easy day trip all around the island, and you’ll get a real feel for the great diversity of culture, and the wonderful beaches. Goats, chickens and cows roam the island at will, and are part of the charm of St Martaan. We snapped this picture at the Simpson Bay Lagoon, just outside of Marigot.

Travel Tip: Make sure you stop to watch a plane land at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Airplanes coming in for a landing make an alarmingly close buzz over the heads of beach goers at Maho Beach. It truly has to be seen to be believed.

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Portuguese Pavement – Lisbon’s Unique Street Tiles https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/europe/portuguese-pavement-lisbons-unique-street-tiles/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/europe/portuguese-pavement-lisbons-unique-street-tiles/#comments Tue, 13 May 2014 17:00:00 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=8708 Unique Portuguese Street Tiles Calçada Portuguesa on Rue Augusta

Cole checking out the tiles on Rue Augusta, Lisbon

Often, it’s the little, quirky things that seem to capture the spirit of wherever we travel, so today we thought we’d let you have a peek into the unique street tile art of Lisbon, Portugal.

The tiles, appropriately called Portuguese pavement or calcada portuguesa, come in many mosaic patterns. Even today they’re painstakingly laid down by hand, following a process created hundreds of years ago. We found these tiles everywhere on the streets of central Lisbon in an incredible variety of artistic patterns.

The origin of the Portuguese street tile is a bit hard to track down, though they first appeared in Lisbon near the Castelo de São Jorge. They became so popular that their use spread quickly throughout the city. Today, the tiles are found all over Portugal, and even in former Portuguese colonies, including Macau, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Brazil.

Black and White Lisbon City Wall Decoration

Sadly, these tiled streets and sidewalks are in danger of disappearing. Not only can they can be incredibly slippery, there are fewer and fewer tradespeople interested in learning the backbreaking art of maintaining these sidewalks.

Luckily for all of us, they are still popular in certain historical areas as well as numerous high end locations in Portugal and abroad.

About Rue Augusta

The photo above was taken on Rue Augusta, in the busiest part of Lisbon. Rue Augusta is a pedestrian only street filled with street cafes, flower stalls, bakeries and specialty shops selling everything from shoes and hats to Portuguese ginjinha liquor. Many old buildings, from the reconstruction of Lisbon by Marquês do Pombal after the 1755 earthquake, are still standing.

More Info

Check out our Pinterest board on Portuguese street tiles, where we’ve curated some of the best photos of these street tiles from around the world.

 The Barefoot Nomad Pinterest Board Portuguese Pavement

If you’re interested in how the pavement is made, the Portuguese Pavements Handbook (Manual da Calçada Portuguesa) has a detailed look at calçada portuguesa, covering everything from origin to detailed building specifications.

Creating the calçada portuguesa is backbreaking work, and even today the tiles are laid in much the same way they were hundreds of years ago. This video gives some idea of the backbreaking work required to create and maintain Portuguese street pavement.

This video shows a sampling of the tile patterns you’ll see all over Lisbon.

Women’s Portuguese Sidewalk Lisbon Portugal Shirt Medium White

Lonely Planet Pocket Lisbon (Travel Guide)

Removable Self-Adhesive Wall Stickers Lisbon

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Looking Down From The Top of The World: In Photos https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/looking-down-from-the-top-of-the-world-in-photos/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/looking-down-from-the-top-of-the-world-in-photos/#comments Fri, 21 Feb 2014 22:00:00 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=8274

 “The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper.” ― W.B. Yeats

Travel, by its very nature, is all about a switch in perspective.

When we’re in unfamiliar territory, things that seemed incredibly important in our everyday lives can suddenly seem trivial. And things that were trivial to us in our day-to-day lives (like a comfortable bed, or a good meal) are suddenly cherished.

So I was thrilled when our fellow travel bloggers (and genuinely awesome people) Heidi and Alan at Wagoner’s Abroad tagged us in an Across The Rooftops photo challenge, first started by Marianne from the East of Málaga blog.

From the post The Best of Lisbon 10 Things You Shouldn’t Miss

Looking down over the Tagus River, Lisbon, Portugal, red roofs

Looking down over the Tagus River

Searching out a great vantage point, and gazing out over the rooftops is one of my favorite ways to play with perspective when we go somewhere new. It’s always a bit disorienting to see a city from up high, but that’s the joy of it, I think.

Here are a few of my favorite places in the world to look down across the rooftops.

From our article Falling in Love with Porto: In Photos

Looking down from the hills above the Duoro Portugal

Looking down from the hills above the Duoro river

Porto's Ribeira district from the Dom Luis Bridge Portugal

Porto’s Ribeira district from the Dom Luis Bridge

Taken from Walking the Cold Walls of Avila and Enjoying the Sunshine

Looking down on the newer Avila, Spain

Looking down on the newer section of Avila, Spain

From our post This Should Be On Your Bucket List: A Hot Air Balloon Ride Over The Cave Houses Of Cappadocia

Ortahisar Castle and abandoned cave houses Turkey

Taken from our hot air balloon basket: Ortahisar Castle and abandoned Cave Houses

From the article VIDEO: Hot Air Ballooning with Butterfly Balloons in Goreme Turkey

Photo taken in Toronto, Canada, in early 2013.

Skyline in Toronto, Canada

Skyline in Toronto, Canada

From our post Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

View of KLCC Park from Petronas Towers Skybridge, Kuala Lumpur

View of KLCC Park from Petronas Towers Skybridge, Kuala Lumpur

From our article A Tour of Morocco Through our iPhone Lens

Looking down on the valley at Ait Benhaddou Morocco

Looking down on the valley at Ait Benhaddou Morocco

We hope you enjoyed!

 

 

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Why You Need to Visit the Galapagos Islands: In Photos https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/why-you-need-to-visit-the-galapagos-islands-in-photos/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/why-you-need-to-visit-the-galapagos-islands-in-photos/#comments Thu, 06 Feb 2014 18:00:00 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=8183 As a recovering scientist (more on that here), I’ve always been fascinated by the Galapagos Islands.

We haven’t visited the Galapagos yet, but I’m looking forward to a day when I get to take our two little ones and chat with them about Darwin’s famous finches.

I’ve spent so much time scouring through photos and blogs in preparation, in fact, that I thought I’d share some of these with you.

I’m happy to note that most of these fantastic photos were taken by fellow travel bloggers. You can find even more of their great photos here on our Galapagos Dreaming Pinterest board.

Sealion at San Cristobal Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Sealion at San Cristobal Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Blue Footed Booby Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Blue Footed Booby Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Kicker rock on San Cristobal courtesy of Finding The Universe

Kicker rock on San Cristobal courtesy of Finding The Universe

Finding The Universe venus setting across Floreana Galapagos

Venus setting across Floreana. Courtesy of Finding the Universe

Marine Iguanas on Land Photo Courtesy Green Global Travel

Marine Iguanas on Land Photo Courtesy Green Global Travel

Penguin on the Surface Photo courtesy From A to B

Penguin on the Surface. Photo courtesy of Alaska to Brazil by Truck

Underwater at Concha del la Perla Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Underwater at Concha del la Perla Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Turtle at San Cristobal Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Turtle at San Cristobal Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Baby turtleBaby turtle Photo courtesy of theplanetD

Photo courtesy of ThePlanetD

Frigatebirds by Peter Wilton Flickr

Frigatebirds by Peter Wilton Flickr

Eagle ray by lowjumpingfrog Flickr

Eagle ray by lowjumpingfrog Flickr

Tortuga Bay Santa Cruz Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Tortuga Bay Santa Cruz Photo courtesy of Adam Off The Radar

Sea Lion Pup by dagpeak Flickr

Sea lion pup by dagpeak Flickr

Sally Lightfoot Crab by A.Davey Flickr

Sally Lightfoot Crab by A.Davey Flickr

Marine Iguana Amblyrhynchus cristatus on Santa Cruz Galapagos Islands by Dallas Krentzel Flickr

Marine Iguana Amblyrhynchus cristatus on Santa Cruz Galapagos Islands by Dallas Krentzel Flickr

Lonesome George by A Davey Flickr

Lonesome George by A. Davey Flickr

Iguana by SaraYeomans Flickr

Iguana by SaraYeomans Flickr

Galapagos Tortoise Geochelone nigra by H.A.S PhotoDesignsHeart+Soul Flickr

Galapagos Tortoise Geochelone Nigra by H.A.S PhotoDesignsHeart+Soul Flickr

Red Landscape in the Galapagos Photo courtesy of ThePlanetD

Photo courtesy of ThePlanetD

Colorful Crab courtesy Traveling Canucks

Colorful Crab courtesy Traveling Canucks

Little Seal by the Traveling Canucks

Little Seal by the Traveling Canucks

Ever in Transit Reef Octopus

Reef Octopus. Photo courtesy of Ever in Transit

Ever in Transit Galapagos Landscape

Photo courtesy of Ever in Transit

Ever in Transit Galapagos Beach

Photo courtesy of Ever in Transit

Ever in Transit Galapagos Opuntia Cactus Adapted To Grow Tall So Tortoises Can’t Eat The Leaves

Opuntia Cactus – adapted to grow leaves high on the plant so tortoises can’t reach the leaves. Photo courtesy of Ever in Transit.

Ever in Transit Galapagos Yellow Cordia Glue Bush Cordia Lutea

Yellow Cordia Glue Bush Cordia Lutea. Photo courtesy of Ever in Transit

Darwin's finch by Green Global Travel

Darwin’s finch. Photo courtesy of Green Global Travel

Mating Green Sea Turtles by Brian Gratwicke on Flickr

Mating Green Sea Turtles by Brian Gratwicke on Flickr

Little penguin underwater Photo courtesy From A to B

Little penguin underwater Photo courtesy From Alaska to Brazil by Truck

Galapagos Islands by Michael R Perry on Flickr

Galapagos Islands by Michael R Perry on Flickr

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Galapagos Rift Exploration 2011 by NOAA Ocean Explorer on Flickr

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Galapagos Rift Exploration 2011 by NOAA Ocean Explorer on Flickr

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Galapagos Rift Exploration 2011 EX1103 Leg2 by NOAA Ocean Explorer Flickr

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Galapagos Rift Exploration by NOAA Ocean Explorer Flickr

Why You Need to Visit the Galapagos Islands: Beautiful photos to inspire you to visit
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A Tour Of Morocco Through Our iPhone Lens https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/morocco-photos-by-instagram/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/morocco-photos-by-instagram/#comments Tue, 31 Dec 2013 18:00:00 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=7876 While we were in Morocco, we spent a lot of time off the grid. Whether we were riding camels in the Sahara, touring the old kasbah at Aït Benhaddou or checking out ancient Sub-Saharan trading routes we were often with limited Internet access. That said, our iPhones became the easiest way to quickly record and share our experiences while out and about.

Morocco is one of those rare places that lives up to its extraordinary reputation. The streets of Marrakech were teeming and busy, with Moroccan mint tea and the comfort of our quiet riad for respite (though getting to our riad was quite a challenge!). There seemed to be photo opportunities at every turn in the sprawling city.

Beautiful photos of Morocco taken with an iphone

During our two day excursion through the Atlas Mountains and into the Sahara, we also took more than our fair share of pics. Many of those were just quick snaps to record the moment, and share on Instagram, but we were so happy with how they turned out that we wanted to share them here too!

But maybe we’ll just let the photos tell you… All of these photos were taken on an iPhone 3GS or iPhone 4S.

Spices in the souks of Marakkesh

Spices in the souks of Marakkesh

Fresh O.J. at stall 28 in Marrakesh

Fresh O.J. at stall 28 in Marrakesh

Color and chaos in the souks of Marrakech

Color and chaos in the souks of Marrakech

Fresh dates at stall 26 in the souks of Marrakesh

Fresh dates at stall 26 in the souks of Marrakesh

The Koutoubia minaret standing over Marrakech

The Koutoubia minaret standing over Marrakech

Peeking out into the narrow streets of the old medina in Marrakesh

Peeking out into the narrow streets of the old medina in Marrakesh

Flowers in the fountain at our riad Morocco Marrakech Marrakesh

Flowers in the fountain at our riad

Our 4x4s ready for a little off road action Morocco Sahara Desert Kingdom

Our 4x4s ready for a little off road action

A roadside market in Morocco

A roadside market in Morocco

On the road in rural Morocco

On the road in rural Morocco

2013-11-23_1385178267

Jordan and Daddy ready to ride

Our camp finally in sight after a long ride Sahara Morocco camel

Our camp finally in sight after a long camel ride

The long trek to our tent camp for the night Morocco Sahara Camel sunset

The long trek to our tent camp for the night

Our comfy camp in the Sahara

Our comfy camp in the Sahara

Sunrise over the Sahara desert

Sunrise over the Sahara desert

Cole in the Sahara

Cole in the sands of the Sahara

The long walk back to camp Sahara Morocco

The long walk back to camp

Looking down on the valley at Ait Benhaddou Morocco

Looking down on the valley at Ait Benhaddou Morocco

Jordan and our guide Idir in the streets of Ait Benhaddou Kasbah, Morocco

Jordan and our guide Idir in the streets of Ait Benhaddou Kasbah, Morocco

This way to Timbuktu The Barefoot Nomad

This way to Timbuktu

Learning how to make argan oil from the experts Morocco

Cole learning how to make argan oil from the experts

Our little man walking the streets of Ait Benhaddou Kasbah, Morocco

Our little man walking the streets of Ait Benhaddou Kasbah, Morocco

Do you use your phone camera way too much? Love sharing those impromptu shots while on the road? If you’re on Instagram, you can join the fun by following us here.

We took many of these photos during our two day, one night  tour with Sahara Desert Kingdom tours. You can contact Sahara Desert Kingdom through their webpage, on Facebook, and read reviews on TripAdvisor here.

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Capturing Precious Fall Moments with the Canon EOS Rebel SL1 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/capturing-precious-fall-moments-with-the-canon-eos-rebel-sl1/ https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/travel-photos/capturing-precious-fall-moments-with-the-canon-eos-rebel-sl1/#comments Thu, 07 Nov 2013 18:00:00 +0000 https://www.thebarefootnomad.com/?p=7551 Canon EOS Rebel SL1, we thought it would be a perfect chance to put this little DSLR camera through its paces. While falling in love with our new camera, we've visited a pumpkin patch and petting zoo with some friends and their kids, walked around the park by Okanagan Lake, hiked along Mission Creek, visited a few wineries and even just taken in the fall colors at our local playground. Come with us as we take a look at what this little beauty can do while capturing the fall beauty of beautiful British Columbia.]]> To say that it’s been a busy few weeks would be an understatement. With winter quickly approaching, we’ve been trying to see and enjoy fall in the interior of British Columbia before the snow flies.

Now that we have our new Canon EOS Rebel SL1, we thought it would be a perfect chance to put this little DSLR camera through its paces.

See the prices and details here.

While falling in love with our new camera, we’ve visited a pumpkin patch and petting zoo with some friends and their kids, walked around the park by Okanagan Lake, hiked along Mission Creek, visited a few wineries and even just taken in the fall colors at our local playground.

There’s a lot to love about this camera, but our absolute favorite thing about it was how fast the shutter was compared to our favorite point and shoot camera. Even with our little ones on the move the images were always nice and crisp.

Little girl portrait with Canon EOS Rebel SL1

Jordan geared up for winter

Cole in the setting sun Canon EOS Rebel SL1

Cole in the setting sun

Since we’re always on the move, we like to keep our gear as light as possible. That said, we love how lightweight this camera is (not only is the Canon SL1 the smallest DSLR in the world, it’s also lighter than a water bottle). In the past we’ve had to trade off portability for quality. With the SL1 that’s no longer the case.

See the prices and details here.

We also love how much fun it is to play with some of the different shooting modes. It totally blows away our favorite point and shoot camera in features. The nice part is that it also does a great job on auto if we don’t have time to compose the shot properly. With kids, that’s a huge plus in our mind.

When we showed the camera to our friends they loved its size and asked more than once for a copy of a picture we just took. They couldn’t believe how clear the pictures were.

Boy feeding a little donkey at the petting zoo Canon EOS Rebel SL1

Cole getting up close at the petting zoo

Minion just hanging around at the pumpkin patchCanon EOS Rebel SL1

Minion just hanging around at the pumpkin patch

Cole (being the little gamer that he is) absolutely loved playing with the touch screen. He loved the touch shutter option so much that he decided to take all his photos just by tapping the touch screen.

We liked how all the camera settings were right there on the screen if we didn’t want to use the traditional buttons. Quickly being able to set the focal point of a shot (like on the Minion and not Jordan in the background) was a huge plus.

We also had a little fun playing with the macro mode, which lets you take fantastic closeups. We’re definitely looking forward to taking more shots of all the delicious meals we enjoy on our travels and the fact that this camera also has a dedicated food picture setting is going to mean a lot more food pictures on this blog in the future.

Pink rose in the sunlight Mission Hill winery Canon Rebel SL1

Using the macro to capture one of fall’s last roses

Sunlight through a leaf Kelowna fall Canon Rebel SL1

Holding up a leaf against the fading sun

A handful of nuts in the fall Canon Rebel SL1

Squirrel bounty!

Probably the nicest thing about getting this camera is that it’s helped cement why we’re currently in the Okanagan in the first place. No matter which way you turn you’re surrounded by lush countryside, lakes, mountains, vineyards, orchards and beaches.

Canada in the fall is always a gorgeous country to be in, but we’re happy that we’re right here, right now in beautiful British Columbia.

Being able to photograph it in all its glory is just icing on the cake. 🙂

Canon EOS Rebel SL1 Mission Creek Kelowna bridge family

Hanging out at Mission Creek

For any of you who were wondering, all of the photos in the post were completely unedited (other than being resized to fit this page and cropped a bit), so the colors and clarity are exactly what you’ll see straight out of the camera. You can find out more about the Rebel SL1’s features here at Canon’s site.

Disclosure: Canon Canada supplied us with a Rebel SL1 and lenses for our personal use. As usual, all opinions are completely our own.

See the prices and details here.

In the mood for some more fall photos? Check out the gallery below.

Minion just hanging around at the pumpkin patchCanon EOS Rebel SL1 Little girl portrait with Canon EOS Rebel SL1 Little girl in touque smiling in fall Sunlight through a leaf Kelowna fall Canon Rebel SL1 Playing on the swings Little girl on the park path in fall Canon EOS Rebel SL1 Mission Creek Kelowna bridge family Cole in the setting sun Canon EOS Rebel SL1 Ducks in the park in fall Okanagan lake looking toward the bridge in fall Cole on bales at the pumpkin patch Fun on the tire swing Little boy looking for bugs on a tree Canon Rebel SL1 Boy feeding a little donkey at the petting zoo Canon EOS Rebel SL1 Pink rose in the sunlight Mission Hill winery Canon Rebel SL1 Daddy and Jordan in the park Ducks in the park Minion in the pumpkin patch Fall colors at Quail's Gate winery A handful of nuts in the fall Canon Rebel SL1 Welcome to the pumpkin patch Playing hockey on the back deck ]]>
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